Canada Day 2019

On July 1st, Canada Day, come find our booth set up on Prince’s Island Park!
We will have visual displays, and several archaeologists and volunteers who will be there to answer any of your questions on archaeology!
Plus check out all the family activities and other booths around the park!!

Downtown Walking Tour

Walking Downtown with an Archaeologist

July 27th @ 9:30am (additional details upon registration)

Have you ever wondered about the archaeology that lies beneath Calgary’s downtown? Wanted to know more about the evolution of our city and the surrounding area? Or have you just wanted to feel like a tourist in your own city? Enjoy a free 2-hour walking tour of downtown and learn about Calgary’s prehistoric and historic journey from 14,000 years ago to 14 years ago.

Contact us at tours@arkycalgary.com to register. Spots are limited so contact us ASAP. Otherwise we will put you on a wait list.

 

April 2019 Lecture Series

April 17th @ 7:30 pm 
University of Calgary, Tom Oliver Room ES 162

History is Beaded into the Land: Archaeological Patterns Métis Lifeways in the 19th century ”
The Canadian west during the 1800s provides an interesting historical and archaeological case study that has potential to shed light on the dynamics of settlement, material culture, and the mobile nature of Métis peoples. Based originally in the Red River Settlement, some of the Métis began to expand west after 1845, forming interconnected wintering communities to participate in winter bison hunting. These wintering communities were almost entirely inhabited by Métis families, so the assemblages from wintering sites present a test case to examine the day to day material culture of the Métis hunting brigades during the mid- to late-1800s. In this paper, I examine patterns from previous and new excavations of Métis wintering sites in Alberta and Saskatchewan, and taking a Métis approach to understanding what these sites mean for understanding the historical significance of these places. I also discuss evidence for the presence of Métis in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan during this era.

Dr. Kisha Supernant is Métis and an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Alberta. She received her PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2011. Her research with Indigenous communities in Canada explores how archaeologists and communities can build collaborative research relationships. Her research interests include the relationship between cultural identities, landscapes, and the use of space, Métis archaeology, and heart-centered archaeological practice. She specializes specializing in the application of mapping methods to the human past and present, including the role of digital mapping and GIS spatial analysis in archaeological research. Her current research project, Exploring Métis Identity Through Archaeology (EMITA), takes a relational approach to exploring the material past of Métis communities, including her own family, in western Canada. She has published in local and international journals on GIS in archaeology, collaborative archaeological practice, indigenous archaeology, and conceptual mapping in digital humanities.

March Lecture Series

MARCH 20th, 2019

Presenter: Patrick Rennie
Location: Room ICT 121 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  The MacHaffie Site and its Place in NW Plains Archaeology

The MacHaffie Site (24JF4), located in SW Montana, has perhaps the best name recognition, while being the most poorly documented multi-component archaeology resource in the NW Plains.  It is also a site with connections to the University of Calgary.  Both Dr. Richard G. Forbis and Leslie B. Davis conducted excavations at the site — the former in 1951 and the latter from 1989 sporadically until 2010.  Although generally thought of as a Folsom campsite, the earliest and best documented occupations appear to be those of Scottsbluff.  The presentation will discuss recent efforts to fully catalogue and analyze the entire MacHaffie collection, the site geomorphology, and the current interpretations of that work.

Intro to Flintknapping Workshop

INTRODUCTION TO FLINTKNAPPING& STONE TOOLS WORKSHOP

Back for the seventh consecutive year, we are offering the workshop over two days at Mount Royal University.

On Saturday March 23rd we will be offering an Introduction to Flintknapping. This course will be beneficial to those new to making stone tools, as well as those just looking for a little extra practice and a few pointers. A basic introduction to techniques involved in the production of chipped stone tools will include: platform preparation, hard hammer and soft hammer percussion and pressure flaking. The course runs 9 am to 3 pm, at Mount Royal University.

On Sunday March 24th, we will be holding a full day Knap-In. This course is aimed at those with a strong desire to improve their existing flintknapping and prehistoric technology skills. The workshop will take the form of instructor led discussion and demonstration on platform preparation and thinning, followed by the numerous techniques utilized in the hafting of arrowheads and spear points to tool shafts (notching, raw hide, sinew, hide glue etc..) As in previous Knap-Ins, we encourage participants to bring their own projects to share experience, skills, and techniques with others. Projects in the past have included slate knives, multi component tools, fluting and the fletching of arrows. The course runs 9 am to 3 pm at Mount Royal University. Please note, that in order to take the second day, you must have taken the first day or an equivalent course (experience with flintknapping is required).

$35.00 for one day / $50.00 for both days
Includes instructions, material and lunch. Space is limited!
Priority will be given to Archaeological Society Members.
The workshop will take place in the Anthropology teaching lab in Room B280.
Please contact Brent Murphy for more information or to register at info@arkycalgary.com

 

Historic Artifact ID Workshop

HISTORIC ARTIFACT IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOP

Interested in learning more about historic artifacts?

Please join us on Saturday, March 9, 2019 (9:00am-4:30pm) with

Dr. Margaret Kennedy (University of Saskatchewan) as our instructor

to learn about glass bottles, historic ceramics, early firearms and ammuntion, among other historic artifact types.

Registration Cost: $50 (includes workshop manual) Workshop to be held at the University of Calgary

To register or for further information please e-mail info@arkycalgary.com

REGISTRATION FOR THIS WORKSHOP IS LIMITED TO 15 PARTICIPANTS PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO PAID CALGARY CENTRE MEMBERS

Registration will open to other Centre Archaeological Society Members on February 21, 2019 (please note, registration does not include food)

February 2019 Lecture Series

FEBRUARY 20th, 2019

Presenter: Jenna Hurtubise
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

 Title:  Entanglements of Conquest: The Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, Nepeña Valley, Peru

From the Romans to the Inca, empires have conquered regional ethnic groups via a multitude of direct and indirect tactics to gain territory and control resource extraction. Collective agency plays a key role in structuring interactions between locals and foreign intruders that cause transformations in material culture and cultural practices of both groups. These interactions are complex and dynamic in nature as locals respond in varying and multiple ways to episodes of conquest in relation to their own political and economic agendas, as well as how they strategize to make sense of these encounters. I am specifically interested in how locals responded immediately after conquest. In what ways were the responses dictated by the foreign states’ means of conquest, as well as indigenous agendas and values? How are negotiations between local and foreign elites and administrators at the moment of conquest reflected culturally and biologically? Are certain mediums more expressive and susceptible to change than others during this time of socio-political stress? This research focuses on these shifting and fluid responses through examining the Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, located in the Nepeña Valley, Peru, during the Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000 – 1400). Through an analysis of the cultural (architecture, ceramics, mortuary practices) and biological (skeletal analysis) data at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña I examine the relationship and interactions between the Chimú and Casma before, during, and after conquest as well as how the Casma responded in varying ways to Chimú conquest.

January 2019 Lecture Series

Presenter: Dr. Elizabeth H. Paris, University of Calgary
Location: 
Room ICT 121 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  Ancient Maya Lithic Technology in the Jovel Valley of Chiapas, Mexico

The ancient Maya are widely recognized for their extensive development of chipped stone tool technology. The objects they created range from elaborate ceremonial objects to the tools that supported the everyday activities of ordinary households. This presentation examines the domestic lithic assemblages from sites in the Jovel Valley of highland Chiapas, which forms the western frontier of the Maya culture area. Located within a mountainous karstic plateau, valley residents had access to multiple sources of high-quality, fine-grained chert, and created diverse assemblages of formal and informal tools. Chert tool production and use in the Jovel Valley was particularly associated with the political center of Moxviquil, where assemblages emphasize weapons production, maguey fiber processing, woodworking, and cross-valley exchange. I also examine the significance of imported obsidian blades and chert spear points within the Jovel Valley, in the context of a robust, local production sphere.

Chacmool 2018- Chacmool as a Community

November 9th-11th

For more than 50 years the Chacmool conference has been the center of archaeological research in western Canada, providing an opportunity to present original research, innovative interpretations, and for professionals and students to network with some of the leading scholars in the discipline. The 2018 conference will focus on building an ever stronger sense of community for local archaeologists, integrating professionals from the consulting industry with academics from across disciplines and from local universities. This is also a critical juncture for the conference, and discussion will also revolve around new directions for the continued success of the program.

Registration will be on-site: $25 for students, $50 for professionals and non-students. Students can also exchange volunteer hours (6 hours) for free admission

Venue: Rosza Centre, University of Calgary

Check out the Program Here

Please contact Dr. Geoffrey McCafferty for more information: mccaffer@ucalgary.ca

 

November 2018 Lecture Series

NOV 21st, 2018

Presenter: Terence Clark
Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan and Director of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  T’i s-tsitsiy-im-ut: the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project (sARP)

This talk will discuss the results of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project, a long-term collaborative project based in Sechelt, BC. SARP has uncovered the most elaborate pre-contact burials yet known in Canada, with one individual interred with over 350,000 ground stone beads. This talk will discuss previous fieldwork activities and outline the future directions of the project. Topics will include coastal survey, shell midden excavation, public archaeology, museum exhibitions, landscapes of meaning, community-based research, and mortuary archaeology.