Intro to Flintknapping Workshop

INTRODUCTION TO FLINTKNAPPING& STONE TOOLS WORKSHOP

Back for the seventh consecutive year, we are offering the workshop over two days at Mount Royal University.

On Saturday March 23rd we will be offering an Introduction to Flintknapping. This course will be beneficial to those new to making stone tools, as well as those just looking for a little extra practice and a few pointers. A basic introduction to techniques involved in the production of chipped stone tools will include: platform preparation, hard hammer and soft hammer percussion and pressure flaking. The course runs 9 am to 3 pm, at Mount Royal University.

On Sunday March 24th, we will be holding a full day Knap-In. This course is aimed at those with a strong desire to improve their existing flintknapping and prehistoric technology skills. The workshop will take the form of instructor led discussion and demonstration on platform preparation and thinning, followed by the numerous techniques utilized in the hafting of arrowheads and spear points to tool shafts (notching, raw hide, sinew, hide glue etc..) As in previous Knap-Ins, we encourage participants to bring their own projects to share experience, skills, and techniques with others. Projects in the past have included slate knives, multi component tools, fluting and the fletching of arrows. The course runs 9 am to 3 pm at Mount Royal University. Please note, that in order to take the second day, you must have taken the first day or an equivalent course (experience with flintknapping is required).

$35.00 for one day / $50.00 for both days
Includes instructions, material and lunch. Space is limited!
Priority will be given to Archaeological Society Members.
The workshop will take place in the Anthropology teaching lab in Room B280.
Please contact Brent Murphy for more information or to register at info@arkycalgary.com

 

Historic Artifact ID Workshop

HISTORIC ARTIFACT IDENTIFICATION WORKSHOP

Interested in learning more about historic artifacts?

Please join us on Saturday, March 9, 2019 (9:00am-4:30pm) with

Dr. Margaret Kennedy (University of Saskatchewan) as our instructor

to learn about glass bottles, historic ceramics, early firearms and ammuntion, among other historic artifact types.

Registration Cost: $50 (includes workshop manual) Workshop to be held at the University of Calgary

To register or for further information please e-mail info@arkycalgary.com

REGISTRATION FOR THIS WORKSHOP IS LIMITED TO 15 PARTICIPANTS PRIORITY WILL BE GIVEN TO PAID CALGARY CENTRE MEMBERS

Registration will open to other Centre Archaeological Society Members on February 21, 2019 (please note, registration does not include food)

February 2019 Lecture Series

FEBRUARY 20th, 2019

Presenter: Jenna Hurtubise
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

 Title:  Entanglements of Conquest: The Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, Nepeña Valley, Peru

From the Romans to the Inca, empires have conquered regional ethnic groups via a multitude of direct and indirect tactics to gain territory and control resource extraction. Collective agency plays a key role in structuring interactions between locals and foreign intruders that cause transformations in material culture and cultural practices of both groups. These interactions are complex and dynamic in nature as locals respond in varying and multiple ways to episodes of conquest in relation to their own political and economic agendas, as well as how they strategize to make sense of these encounters. I am specifically interested in how locals responded immediately after conquest. In what ways were the responses dictated by the foreign states’ means of conquest, as well as indigenous agendas and values? How are negotiations between local and foreign elites and administrators at the moment of conquest reflected culturally and biologically? Are certain mediums more expressive and susceptible to change than others during this time of socio-political stress? This research focuses on these shifting and fluid responses through examining the Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, located in the Nepeña Valley, Peru, during the Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000 – 1400). Through an analysis of the cultural (architecture, ceramics, mortuary practices) and biological (skeletal analysis) data at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña I examine the relationship and interactions between the Chimú and Casma before, during, and after conquest as well as how the Casma responded in varying ways to Chimú conquest.

January 2019 Lecture Series

Presenter: Dr. Elizabeth H. Paris, University of Calgary
Location: 
Room ICT 121 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  Ancient Maya Lithic Technology in the Jovel Valley of Chiapas, Mexico

The ancient Maya are widely recognized for their extensive development of chipped stone tool technology. The objects they created range from elaborate ceremonial objects to the tools that supported the everyday activities of ordinary households. This presentation examines the domestic lithic assemblages from sites in the Jovel Valley of highland Chiapas, which forms the western frontier of the Maya culture area. Located within a mountainous karstic plateau, valley residents had access to multiple sources of high-quality, fine-grained chert, and created diverse assemblages of formal and informal tools. Chert tool production and use in the Jovel Valley was particularly associated with the political center of Moxviquil, where assemblages emphasize weapons production, maguey fiber processing, woodworking, and cross-valley exchange. I also examine the significance of imported obsidian blades and chert spear points within the Jovel Valley, in the context of a robust, local production sphere.

Chacmool 2018- Chacmool as a Community

November 9th-11th

For more than 50 years the Chacmool conference has been the center of archaeological research in western Canada, providing an opportunity to present original research, innovative interpretations, and for professionals and students to network with some of the leading scholars in the discipline. The 2018 conference will focus on building an ever stronger sense of community for local archaeologists, integrating professionals from the consulting industry with academics from across disciplines and from local universities. This is also a critical juncture for the conference, and discussion will also revolve around new directions for the continued success of the program.

Registration will be on-site: $25 for students, $50 for professionals and non-students. Students can also exchange volunteer hours (6 hours) for free admission

Venue: Rosza Centre, University of Calgary

Check out the Program Here

Please contact Dr. Geoffrey McCafferty for more information: mccaffer@ucalgary.ca

 

November 2018 Lecture Series

NOV 21st, 2018

Presenter: Terence Clark
Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan and Director of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  T’i s-tsitsiy-im-ut: the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project (sARP)

This talk will discuss the results of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project, a long-term collaborative project based in Sechelt, BC. SARP has uncovered the most elaborate pre-contact burials yet known in Canada, with one individual interred with over 350,000 ground stone beads. This talk will discuss previous fieldwork activities and outline the future directions of the project. Topics will include coastal survey, shell midden excavation, public archaeology, museum exhibitions, landscapes of meaning, community-based research, and mortuary archaeology.

Downtown Calgary Walk

October 13th, 10:30am-12:30pm

Have you ever wondered about the archaeology that lies beneath Calgary’s downtown? Wanted to know more about the evolution of our city and the surrounding area? Or have you just wanted to feel like a tourist in your own city?
The ASA is offering a downtown walking tour this October. It’s free. It’s outside. It’s your city. So come join us for a two hour walk around downtown.
Space is limited but if need be we may add a second day.
Contact us at info@arkycalgary.com to sign up!!

October 2018 Lecture Series

Where & When: U of C, Tom Oliver Room ES162 @ 730pm, Oct 17th

Presenter: Ben Potter

Title: Ancient Beringians and the Colonization of the Americas

Recent genetic analyses of two buried infants from Alaska reveal a previously unknown group of people, called Ancient Beringians, that play an important role in illuminating the early prehistory of Native Americans. These and other recent genetic analyses have transformed our understanding of the peopling of the Americas. This presentation explores this new genetic framework, rigorously connected to archaeology and paleoecology of Siberia, Beringia and Northwestern North America. The timing of migrations, the routes used, including the interior Ice-Free-Corridor and coastal route (or both), and the later genetic diversification of Native Americans are discussed. The integration of these sciences provides for novel models of this first colonization of the Americas.

Edworthy Park Walking Tour

The ASA-Calgary Centre would like to invite you to our free walking tour of Edworthy Park on Sunday, September 23 from 10:30-12. Join us for a fun, informative ramble through the ages to reveal the unique facets of one of Calgary’s recreational gems. We’ll be exploring the fascinating geological, archaeological and historic past of this popular spot and learn why it has been a local hot spot for many millennia. Glacial lakes, stone circles, and sandstone quarrying are just a few of the topics that will be covered. Space is limited so please preregister to attend. Preregister by e-mailing info@arkycalgary.com. Registrants will be emailed with more appropriate parking info, map, etc.

September 2018 Lecture Series

We are back with our Lecture Series starting September 19th, 2018.
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary

Presenter:  Jack Brink
Curator Emiritus, Royal Alberta Museum

Title:  Archaeological Survey, and a UNESCO World Heritage Nomination, for Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park.

Writing-on-Stone Park (WOS) is home to one of the largest collections of rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) in North America. Spread over a vast region of the Milk River valley and tributary coulees are thousands of carved and painted rock art images. So important is this rock art and associated landscape that the Park area has been proposed for designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This nomination is currently under consideration. In anticipation of the nomination Alberta Parks acquired two new parcels of land located along the Milk River to the west of the current park. In total some 14 quarter sections were acquired. I volunteered to conduct an initial archaeological review of these new lands in order to give Parks a better understanding of heritage resources on their property. In this talk I will discuss the results of these surveys, including new discoveries of rock art, historic graffiti, archaeological and historic sites. In addition, I will provide an inside look at the UNESCO nomination process that took 13 years to complete.