February 2019 Lecture Series

FEBRUARY 20th, 2019

Presenter: Jenna Hurtubise
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

 Title:  Entanglements of Conquest: The Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, Nepeña Valley, Peru

From the Romans to the Inca, empires have conquered regional ethnic groups via a multitude of direct and indirect tactics to gain territory and control resource extraction. Collective agency plays a key role in structuring interactions between locals and foreign intruders that cause transformations in material culture and cultural practices of both groups. These interactions are complex and dynamic in nature as locals respond in varying and multiple ways to episodes of conquest in relation to their own political and economic agendas, as well as how they strategize to make sense of these encounters. I am specifically interested in how locals responded immediately after conquest. In what ways were the responses dictated by the foreign states’ means of conquest, as well as indigenous agendas and values? How are negotiations between local and foreign elites and administrators at the moment of conquest reflected culturally and biologically? Are certain mediums more expressive and susceptible to change than others during this time of socio-political stress? This research focuses on these shifting and fluid responses through examining the Chimú conquest of the Casma at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña, located in the Nepeña Valley, Peru, during the Late Intermediate Period (A.D. 1000 – 1400). Through an analysis of the cultural (architecture, ceramics, mortuary practices) and biological (skeletal analysis) data at Pan de Azúcar de Nepeña I examine the relationship and interactions between the Chimú and Casma before, during, and after conquest as well as how the Casma responded in varying ways to Chimú conquest.

January 2019 Lecture Series

Presenter: Dr. Elizabeth H. Paris, University of Calgary
Location: 
Room ICT 121 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  Ancient Maya Lithic Technology in the Jovel Valley of Chiapas, Mexico

The ancient Maya are widely recognized for their extensive development of chipped stone tool technology. The objects they created range from elaborate ceremonial objects to the tools that supported the everyday activities of ordinary households. This presentation examines the domestic lithic assemblages from sites in the Jovel Valley of highland Chiapas, which forms the western frontier of the Maya culture area. Located within a mountainous karstic plateau, valley residents had access to multiple sources of high-quality, fine-grained chert, and created diverse assemblages of formal and informal tools. Chert tool production and use in the Jovel Valley was particularly associated with the political center of Moxviquil, where assemblages emphasize weapons production, maguey fiber processing, woodworking, and cross-valley exchange. I also examine the significance of imported obsidian blades and chert spear points within the Jovel Valley, in the context of a robust, local production sphere.

November 2018 Lecture Series

NOV 21st, 2018

Presenter: Terence Clark
Assistant Professor, University of Saskatchewan and Director of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary @ 7:30pm

Title:  T’i s-tsitsiy-im-ut: the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project (sARP)

This talk will discuss the results of the shíshálh Archaeological Research Project, a long-term collaborative project based in Sechelt, BC. SARP has uncovered the most elaborate pre-contact burials yet known in Canada, with one individual interred with over 350,000 ground stone beads. This talk will discuss previous fieldwork activities and outline the future directions of the project. Topics will include coastal survey, shell midden excavation, public archaeology, museum exhibitions, landscapes of meaning, community-based research, and mortuary archaeology.

October 2018 Lecture Series

Where & When: U of C, Tom Oliver Room ES162 @ 730pm, Oct 17th

Presenter: Ben Potter

Title: Ancient Beringians and the Colonization of the Americas

Recent genetic analyses of two buried infants from Alaska reveal a previously unknown group of people, called Ancient Beringians, that play an important role in illuminating the early prehistory of Native Americans. These and other recent genetic analyses have transformed our understanding of the peopling of the Americas. This presentation explores this new genetic framework, rigorously connected to archaeology and paleoecology of Siberia, Beringia and Northwestern North America. The timing of migrations, the routes used, including the interior Ice-Free-Corridor and coastal route (or both), and the later genetic diversification of Native Americans are discussed. The integration of these sciences provides for novel models of this first colonization of the Americas.

September 2018 Lecture Series

We are back with our Lecture Series starting September 19th, 2018.
Location: Tom Oliver Room ES 162 , University of Calgary

Presenter:  Jack Brink
Curator Emiritus, Royal Alberta Museum

Title:  Archaeological Survey, and a UNESCO World Heritage Nomination, for Writing-on-Stone Provincial Park.

Writing-on-Stone Park (WOS) is home to one of the largest collections of rock art (petroglyphs and pictographs) in North America. Spread over a vast region of the Milk River valley and tributary coulees are thousands of carved and painted rock art images. So important is this rock art and associated landscape that the Park area has been proposed for designation as a UNESCO World Heritage Site. This nomination is currently under consideration. In anticipation of the nomination Alberta Parks acquired two new parcels of land located along the Milk River to the west of the current park. In total some 14 quarter sections were acquired. I volunteered to conduct an initial archaeological review of these new lands in order to give Parks a better understanding of heritage resources on their property. In this talk I will discuss the results of these surveys, including new discoveries of rock art, historic graffiti, archaeological and historic sites. In addition, I will provide an inside look at the UNESCO nomination process that took 13 years to complete.

March Lecture Series

Presenter: Dr. Max Friesen, University of Toronto
Title: Inuvialuit Architecture: The Archaeology of Cruciform Houses in the Mackenzie Delta
Where:University of Calgary ICT 121
When: March 21st, 7:30 pm
Within the great range of house types occupied by Northern peoples in the 19th century, a few stand out due to their size, complexity, or unusual form. One of the most spectacular is the cruciform semi-subterranean house occupied by Inuvialuit in the Mackenzie Delta region, Northwest Territories. These are known through traditional knowledge and ethnohistoric sources as very large, carefully constructed driftwood-framed houses with three alcoves bordering a central floor area. Over the past 60 years, several archaeologists have excavated portions of cruciform houses, leading to gradually increasing knowledge about them. However, due to their great size, deep burial, and problems with permafrost, it has been difficult to excavate one fully. In this paper, I report on the recent excavation of two large cruciform houses at the site of Kuukpak on the East Channel of the Mackenzie River. Following a brief overview of the ethnohistoric record, I will interpret aspects of the houses’ architectural form, construction techniques, episodes of rebuilding, and change over time.

November Lecture Series

Mallows Bay, The Ghost Fleet and Beyond

Dr. Sue Langley, State Underwater Archaeologist,
Maryland Historical Trust, Maryland Department of Planning

**** ICT 121 *** ROOM CHANGE FOR THE MONTH
November 15th, 2017 @ 7:30 pm

On an ebb tide, nearly 100 skeletons
of WWI-era wooden steamboats seem to rise from
the waters of a small embayment on the Potomac
River. This presentation will explain the history of
these watercraft and how they ended up in Maryland
and why they will be the focus of the first new
National Marine Sanctuary in more than 20 years.
While the centenary commemorations of WWI
make this a timely endeavor, the area is steeped
in history; much of it also represented in and
around the bay.

BIOGRAPHY – Since completing her MA and PhD at The
University of Calgary, Dr. Langley has been the Maryland
State Underwater Archaeologist for more than 23 years
directing the Maryland Maritime Archaeology Program
within the Department of Planning’s Maryland Historical
Trust. She is an adjunct professor at several colleges and
universities, where she teaches underwater archaeology
and the history of piracy. She also taught maritime
archaeology in Thailand for several years for the Southeast
Asian Ministers of Education Organization (SEAMEO,
part of UNESCO). She is an active PADI Master SCUBA
Diver Trainer, and lectures globally on a variety of subjects
including maritime archaeology and piracy, as well as
textile technology, food ways, and the archaeology of
beekeeping and its current practices globally. An active
beekeeper, she is also responsible for the hive at Government
House. including maritime archaeology and piracy, as well as textile technology, food ways, and the archaeology of beekeeping and its current practices globally. An active beekeeper, she is also responsible for the hive at Government House.

October Lecture Series

Thunderbird and Whale: The Archaeology of Nuu-chah-nulth
Whaling

Wednesday, October 18, 2017
University of Calgary
Tom Oliver Room, ES 162, 7:30pm

Dr. Alan McMillan, Department of Archaeology, Simon Fraser
University
Abstract: Whaling was a central theme in the lives of the Nuu-chahnulth people of western Vancouver Island. It featured heavily in not only their traditional economy but their art, ceremonies, and oral histories. This talk presents recent archaeological research in Barkley Sound, emphasizing evidence of ancient whaling, its development, and its persistence in Nuu chah-nulth art and traditions today.

Alan McMillan is an adjunct professor in the Department of Archaeology at Simon Fraser University. He has conducted extensive research on the archaeology and ethnohistory of Northwest Coast Indigenous peoples, particularly the Nuu-chahnulth of western Vancouver Island, and has written numerous books and monographs, articles, and reports.

September Lecture Series

SEPT 20th: ES 162

Presenter:  Dr. Craig Lee, Principal Investigator at Metcalf Archaeological Consultants, a Research Scientist II/Associate Professor at the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research (INSTAAR), and an Adjunct Instructor in the Department of Sociology & Anthropology at Montana State University

Title:  Ice Patch Archaeology in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

Periglacial alpine snow and ice is melting in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem (GYE) and around the world in response to changing weather patterns. As it melts, some of this ancient ice is releasing an astonishing array of paleobiological and archaeological material, including trees, plants, animals, and insects, as well as rare and unique organic artifacts such as dart shafts, basketry, and other pieces of material culture.  Consistent with the oral traditions of many tribal groups, the GYE ice patch record allows for the conceptualization of the alpine—in ancient times, at least—as an ecosystem in balance where humans and animals alike took advantage of a seasonally-enriched biome; however, much remains to be learned.

Ice patch resources are finite and may be lost in the coming decades.  The exposure of ancient archaeological and paleobiological materials by the retreat of moisture-starved and heat-ravaged ice patches in the GYE is a tangible indication of climate change in the Rocky Mountain West, and the impacts transcend the divide between the cultural and natural world.  The archaeological record demonstrates repeated use of ice patches by Native Americans for millennia.  They were an important element of their sociocultural and geographic landscape.

A project sponsored by the Greater Yellowstone Coordinating Committee (GYCC) in 2013 resulted in the identification of over 450 prospective ice patches consistent with a posteriori criteria developed from observations at known ice patch archaeological and paleobiological sites in the GYE and elsewhere.  Even more recently (2016), the ‘Camp Monaco Prize’ from the Buffalo Bill Historical Center’s Draper Natural History Museum, University of Wyoming’s Biodiversity Institute, and the Prince Albert II of Monaco Foundation enabled a group of scientists from the Institute of Arctic and Alpine Research at the University of Colorado, the Institute on Ecosystems at Montana State University, and the US Geological Survey to undertake an intensive analysis of GYE ice patches, including a coring effort and field survey.

Public Excavation: Cluny Fortified Village

Public Archaeology Program Cluny Fortified Village: May 23rd – June 23rd 

The University of Calgary is offering a volunteer excavation program at Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park. Participants will excavate alongside members of the Archaeology Field School at the famous Cluny Fortified Village site. First time participants will receive a tour of the archaeological site. Volunteers will be supervised by experienced University of Calgary graduate students, and training in archaeological excavation techniques will be provided on site. All artifacts from the site are the property of the Siksika Nation and, ultimately, will be stored at Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park Interpretive Centre.

The program will operate from May 23 to June 23, 2017, Monday–Friday. Participants must commit to a minimum of two days with the program.
Cost consists of the daily admission fee to Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park ($12.00 + GST for adults, $8.00+GST for children and seniors). Participants will meet with volunteer program supervisors at the Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park Interpretive Centre parking lot at 9:00 AM each day—please note that there are no overnight accommodation facilities at the park. The work day runs from 9:00 AM to 4:00 PM.
Minimum age of participation is 12. Participants under the age of 18 must be accompanied by a responsible adult at all times. All participants will be required to complete a Volunteer Liability Waiver Form and a Photography Waiver Form. The guardian of participants under the age of 18 must also complete an Informed Consent Form.

Visit https://arky.ucalgary.ca/public-archaeology/ for more information. To register or for more information, email pubarky@ucalgary.ca or call 403-220-8537.

The Public Archaeology Program, the Department of Anthropology and Archaeology, and the University of Calgary are not responsible for cancelled registrations or cancellations as the result of severe weather conditions. In the event of severe weather conditions, the Public Archaeology Program will attempt to contact excavation participants either the night before or early on the day of excavation. Changing weather conditions in the field may require cancellation of the workday while at the site. In either case, no refunds of the Blackfoot Crossing Historical Park admission fee or costs relating to travel to the park will be provided. Participants may re-register for alternative participation dates, but there is no guarantee that there will be other dates available in the excavation program.