March Lecture Series

***CANCELLED***

MARCH 18th (Calgary Public Library – Central Location, Patricia A. Whelan Room) @ 7:30 pm:
Chris Jass, Royal Alberta Museum

Beneath the Surface: Bison, Lakes, and Public-influenced Research in Alberta

Research on the Quaternary palaeontological record in Alberta takes many forms, ranging from prospecting in gravel pits to excavating cave deposits. As a result of public inquiries, efforts to further understand the late Quaternary history of Alberta has taken on a new, surprising direction. Prospecting for fossils in modern Alberta lakes is revealing a complex faunal record that spans the last 10,000 years. These records highlight palaeoenvironmental changes in the mid-Holocene and provide insight into the faunal history of areas of Alberta with otherwise sparse Quaternary fossil records.

February Lecture Series

FEBRUARY 19th (Calgary Public Library – Central Location, Patricia A. Whelan Room) @ 7:30 pm:
Michael Parker-Pearson, Institute of Archaeology, University College London
Stonehenge: New Discoveries

In the last 15 years there has been a transformation in our knowledge about this iconic and mysterious stone circle. Not only have new excavations revealed unexpected discoveries but a battery of scientific methods has been applied to the monument, its landscape and its artifacts. New discoveries about Stonehenge are being made almost continuously, making research into its mysteries a roller-coaster ride for archaeologists and scientists.

January Lecture Series

JANUARY 15th (Calgary Public Library – Central Location, Patricia A. Whelan Room) @ 7:30 pm:
Genevieve LeMoine, The Peary-MacMillan Arctic Museum-Bowdoin College
On the Edge of the North Water: Cultural Contact at the Gateway to Greenland

Foulke Fjord, in northwestern Greenland lies at the northern end of the North Water polynya, an area of open water that forms annually in the sea ice at the northern end of Baffin Bay that supports a rich and diverse community of marine life, from whales to sea birds. This ecological hotspot has attracted human inhabitants for the last 4500 years. In this presentation I will present the results of three seasons of research at one site in this region, Iita (Etah), on the north shore of the fjord. Historically Iita was an important nexus of cultural contact between Inughuit and Euro-American explorers, as well as Inuit migrants from Baffin Island led by the shaman Qitdlarsuaq. A remarkable sequence of discreet stratigraphic levels also reveal earlier occupations, including both late Dorset paleo-Inuit and pioneering Thule. In addition to shedding light on key episodes of cultural contact in this region, Iita is also a bellwether of sorts for archaeological sites in the Arctic as even in this northerly location diminished sea ice has accelerated erosion.

November Lecture Series

NOVEMBER 20th (University of Calgary, ES 162) @ 7:30 pm:
Bill Perry, Parks Canada
Archaeological Resource Management in a post wildfire environment: Waterton Lakes NP.

Waterton Lakes National Park is part of a rich cultural landscape that stretches back around ten thousand years primarily within the traditional territories of the Blackfoot Nation.  The Kenow Wildfire of 2017 has presented a unique opportunity for archaeological research in the Park.  The wildfire cleared out the ground cover, allowing exceptional visibility of the land surface.

Parks Canada has put together a team of archaeologists for a 5-year project to record and research the new finds that come to light.  Initial site survey results have uncovered an unprecedented degree of archaeological visibility focused on the last 1000 years.  This presentation highlights archaeological research and engagement with the surrounding indigenous nations, communities, local landowners and interested public.

Excavation and core sampling of select archaeological sites are planned for the coming field season that afford potential to report on the complete regional human history time frame within the park with a focus on environmental/climate change and past fire history research.

October Lecture Series

OCTOBER 16th (University of Calgary, ES 162) @ 7:30 pm:
Jeremy Leyden, University of Calgary
Recent Archaeological Investigations into the Precontact Bison Hunting Complex Along Lower Jumpingpound Creek

As a result of archaeological research into the effects of the 2013 southern Alberta floods, a spectacular bone bed associated with a previously unrecorded buffalo jump was identified along the banks Jumpingpound Creek. Investigations into this locality have revealed it to be at the heart of a substantial late precontact/protohistoric period bison hunting complex typified by kill deposits, drive structures, campsites, processing areas and related peripheral features. At the same time, this locality appears to be a named place associated with the oral traditions of local First Nations and which occurs in the context of a variety of natural, historical, traditional and archaeological phenomena germane to the understanding of its importance. This talk will discuss the findings of nearly four years of research at this location; work that was undertaken through a combination of professional and academic programs and which continues to progress.

September Lecture Series

SEPTEMBER 18th (University of Calgary, ES 162) @ 7:30pm :
Jon Driver, Simon Fraser University
Late Pleistocene people and environments at Tse’K’wa

Tse’K’wa (also known as Charlie Lake Cave) is located in northeastern British Columbia, Canada, and contains a deep sequence of deposits that span the last 12,500 years. As well as being a key to the cultural sequence in northeastern BC and northwestern Alberta, the site also contains tens of thousands of well-preserved animal bones that document changing environmental conditions and a range of human behaviours, including hunting, fishing, food storage, and ceremonial. This presentation will focus on the early period at the site, and will include new data from biomolecular studies of the animal bones.

Canada Day 2019

On July 1st, Canada Day, come find our booth set up on Prince’s Island Park!
We will have visual displays, and several archaeologists and volunteers who will be there to answer any of your questions on archaeology!
Plus check out all the family activities and other booths around the park!!

Downtown Walking Tour

Walking Downtown with an Archaeologist

July 27th @ 9:30am (additional details upon registration)

Have you ever wondered about the archaeology that lies beneath Calgary’s downtown? Wanted to know more about the evolution of our city and the surrounding area? Or have you just wanted to feel like a tourist in your own city? Enjoy a free 2-hour walking tour of downtown and learn about Calgary’s prehistoric and historic journey from 14,000 years ago to 14 years ago.

Contact us at tours@arkycalgary.com to register. Spots are limited so contact us ASAP. Otherwise we will put you on a wait list.

 

April 2019 Lecture Series

April 17th @ 7:30 pm 
University of Calgary, Tom Oliver Room ES 162

History is Beaded into the Land: Archaeological Patterns Métis Lifeways in the 19th century ”
The Canadian west during the 1800s provides an interesting historical and archaeological case study that has potential to shed light on the dynamics of settlement, material culture, and the mobile nature of Métis peoples. Based originally in the Red River Settlement, some of the Métis began to expand west after 1845, forming interconnected wintering communities to participate in winter bison hunting. These wintering communities were almost entirely inhabited by Métis families, so the assemblages from wintering sites present a test case to examine the day to day material culture of the Métis hunting brigades during the mid- to late-1800s. In this paper, I examine patterns from previous and new excavations of Métis wintering sites in Alberta and Saskatchewan, and taking a Métis approach to understanding what these sites mean for understanding the historical significance of these places. I also discuss evidence for the presence of Métis in southern Alberta and Saskatchewan during this era.

Dr. Kisha Supernant is Métis and an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of Alberta. She received her PhD from the University of British Columbia in 2011. Her research with Indigenous communities in Canada explores how archaeologists and communities can build collaborative research relationships. Her research interests include the relationship between cultural identities, landscapes, and the use of space, Métis archaeology, and heart-centered archaeological practice. She specializes specializing in the application of mapping methods to the human past and present, including the role of digital mapping and GIS spatial analysis in archaeological research. Her current research project, Exploring Métis Identity Through Archaeology (EMITA), takes a relational approach to exploring the material past of Métis communities, including her own family, in western Canada. She has published in local and international journals on GIS in archaeology, collaborative archaeological practice, indigenous archaeology, and conceptual mapping in digital humanities.